Biology Grandstudent|State University of Jakarta|year of 2010|crazy|happy|for whole question, opinion, &other please contact us at biobios.biology@gmail.com|thanks for stopping by ppl :)

 

tumblrbot asked
WHERE WOULD YOU MOST LIKE TO VISIT ON YOUR PLANET?

the little homie place called earth :)

landscapelifescape:

Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia
Starfish (by Garry - www.visionandimagination.com)
phylum: echinodermata
class: asteroidea
genus: linckia

landscapelifescape:

Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

Starfish (by Garry - www.visionandimagination.com)

phylum: echinodermata

class: asteroidea

genus: linckia

neaq:

The coral reef around Totoya Island, Fiji (Photo: Keith Ellenbogen)
Click through to see more of Keith’s images.

phylum: coelenterata/ cnidaria
The coral reef. amazing :D

neaq:

The coral reef around Totoya Island, Fiji (Photo: Keith Ellenbogen)

Click through to see more of Keith’s images.

phylum: coelenterata/ cnidaria

The coral reef. amazing :D

maxilovesmini:

Linckia Laevigata 
Phylum: Echinodermata
Class: Asteroidea
Bira Island- North Jakarta- Indonesia

maxilovesmini:

Linckia Laevigata 

Phylum: Echinodermata

Class: Asteroidea

Bira Island- North Jakarta- Indonesia

Sea Hares- Nudibrachia (Aplysia sp.)
Phylum  : Mollusca
Class : Gastropoda
Order : Anaspidea (Aplisiacea)
Family : Aplysiidae
Genus : Aplysia
Spesies : Aplysia sp.

Bira Island- north Jakarta- Indonesia

Sea Hares- Nudibrachia (Aplysia sp.)

Phylum  : Mollusca

Class : Gastropoda

Order : Anaspidea (Aplisiacea)

Family : Aplysiidae

Genus : Aplysia

Spesies : Aplysia sp.

Bira Island- north Jakarta- Indonesia

allcreatures:

Twenty-three feather tail gliders have been born at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo in the past two months, taking the zoo’s population to 48.

allcreatures:

Twenty-three feather tail gliders have been born at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo in the past two months, taking the zoo’s population to 48.

Fossil Sirenians, Related to Today's Manatees, Give Scientists New Look at Ancient Climate

chimaeriste:

April 24, 2011

What tales they tell of their former lives, these old bones of sirenians, relatives of today’s dugongs and manatees. And now, geologists have found, they tell of the waters in which they swam.

While researching the evolutionary ecology of ancient sirenians — commonly known as sea cows — scientist Mark Clementz and colleagues unexpectedly stumbled across data that could change the view of climate during the Eocene Epoch, some 50 million years ago.

Clementz, from the University of Wyoming, published the results in a paper in this week’s issue of the journal Science. [full story]

A fossil sirenian named Halitherium schinzi, shown at the Paris National Museum of Natural History. (Credit: Mark Clementz)